Thesis Statement For Business Ethics

The thesis statement examples compiled below will give you an idea on how to draft a thesis statement for your research paper or essay.

Enjoy!

Thesis Statement Example for a Study Question

In this example of thesis statement, the emphasis of the study is to find a correlation, either positive or negative, between Mozart’s music and short term memory. This is an example of a research paper with data observation and analysis. The observations were recorded by running ANOVA and Post Hoc tests to compute values for the variables.

The goal was to find a positive correlation between the two variables. For that a hypothesis was tested that was proven to be negative. Alternatively, this proved the scientific validation of the null hypothesis i.e. “positive correlation exists between short term memory and listening to Mozart’s music.” The actual thesis statement is both precise and straight to the point yet some explanation has been given to elaborate the details of the study.

Thesis Subject:The Effect of Mozart’s Music on Short Term Memory

Sample Thesis Statement: The thesis statement is created from the essential question i.e. “is there any presence of a positive cause and effect relationship on the memory status of the students who listen to Mozart’s music, as it is propagated in the theory of Mozart’s effect”. The hypothesis tested for this study is, “Listening to Mozart’s music has no effect on human memory”.

Thesis Statement Example for a Research Essay

This is an example of a research essay thesis statement. While writing a thesis statement for a research essay you have to strictly take a for or against approach and then justify your argument. For such type of thesis statements, it’s best to gather your material beforehand and then write your thesis statement, lastly.

In the first example, the thesis statement is vague and does not clearly illustrate the researcher’s point of view. It only gives a brief overview about the topic undertaken. On the other hand, the second thesis statement clearly presents the view of the researcher and indicates how the study follows up and what it is trying to prove. So the second Sample Thesis Statement B ranks higher than Sample Thesis Statement A.

Thesis Subject: Suppose you are given to debate on the ethics of Organ Trade in a research essay. The topic being broad calls for a

Sample Thesis Statement A:Ethical Implications of Organ Trade

Sample Thesis Statement B: Dire Consequences of Organ Trade to the Society

Thesis Statement Example for a Science Paper

This is an example of a thesis statement for a science paper where you need to specifically screen out an exact hypothesis that would lead the finding of your research. Since the research heavily relies on statistical measure and data tabulations so it’s best to be specific with minimal leaning towards the theoretical bend in thesis statements.

Thesis Subject: The topic involved the exploitation and application of metacognition to see its impact on the problem solving abilities of students. The study was carried out for a model of metacognitive thinking strategies which are self-efficacy, definition, exploration, accommodation, strategy, execution and verification.

Sample Thesis Statement: Students with higher levels of success rates in solving calculus problems tend to be frequent exploiters of metacongnitive thinking strategies.

Thesis Statement Example for a Research Paper

This is a thesis statement example for a research paper where you have to argue your point by providing evidence from reliable resources (journal articles, newspapers etc). The thesis statement is self explanatory and indicates the stand point of the author.

Thesis Subject: Affect of the fiscal and economic strategy, outlined in Budget Report of Chancellor (October 2007) on the economic and fiscal strategy policy.

Sample Thesis Statement: Impact of Budget Report of Chancellor (October 2007) in achieving Government’s macroeconomic objectives.

Thesis Statement Example to Explore an Essential Question

In this example of a thesis statement, the topic undertaken is broken down and assembled into parts to compose a thesis statement. Here it is more of an “essential question” than a brief hypothesis.

Thesis Subject: To explore the affect of contemporary movement on interior design development and performance.

Sample Thesis Statement: The discussion so far reveals that there is indeed the presence of a significant positive relationship between the contemporary movement in influencing the trends and practices of interior design. But here, the essential question that lies with us is that what are the channels and mediums through which this influence is generated and pulled off.

I hope these thesis statement examples would help you in shooting off your own thesis statement without any hassle. If you have any further questions, please feel free to drop a line.

Happy Thesis Statement-ing!

A thesis statement is that sentence or two that asserts your position on a given issue, specifically, the position that you will be arguing for in your paper. This thesis statement should appear somewhere in the introduction to your paper. It can be the first sentence, although that’s often a rather simplistic and unexciting way to begin your paper. More often, then, a thesis statement should appear at or near the end of the first paragraph or two.

The first step in developing a thesis (once you have decided on a topic) is to determine what your position is. To do this, you will need to thoroughly review all the relevant course materials. In most cases, you will have been presented with a number of arguments on both sides of the issue. Carefully analyze and evaluate all these arguments, taking notes as you do. In the process, you should develop your own take on the issue.

It is imperative that you clearly define your thesis before you begin writing, for it is your thesis that will guide you throughout the entire writing process—everything you write should somehow contribute to its defense. This doesn’t mean that your thesis can’t be revised, narrowed, or refined during the writing process; it’s likely that it will need to be. The point is that you won’t even know where to start unless you have at least a working thesis to guide you.

Your thesis should narrow the focus of your paper. Suppose you are asked to write on the mind-body problem. It’s important to realize that it won't be possible to address every important philosophical issue concerning such a broad topic in just one paper. You'll need to choose a thesis that narrows the focus to something more manageable. Don't be too ambitious here. You're not going to solve something like the mind-body problem in five, or even twenty, pages. Of course, it’s also important not to go too far in the opposite direction. Your thesis mustn’t be trivial. Instead, your thesis should make an interesting assertion, one over which reasonable people might disagree.

Your thesis should be quite specific, thereby defining a sharp focus for your paper. Don’t make a claim such as “People should donate money to hunger-relief organizations.” This is vague. Are you saying that donating money to hunger-relief organizations is moral obligatory, or are you merely claiming that doing so would be supererogatory? In either case, you should state your reasons for making the claim that you do, for your thesis should provide some hint as to what the main argument will be.

To sum up, a thesis statement should:

  • Be specific.
  • Be narrow enough as to be practicably defended within the length parameters of the assignment.
  • Make an interesting claim, one over which reasonable people might disagree. 
  • Provide some hint as to what the main line of argument will be.

The following are some DOs and DON’Ts.

Don’t have a thesis like this: 

  • I will argue that act-utilitarianism is the most plausible moral theory around.
  • NOTE: This is too ambitious. There is no chance of adequately defending such a claim in anything shorter than a series of books. To defend such a claim, you would have to compare act-utilitarianism with Kantianism, rule-utilitarianism, virtue ethics, moral relativism, moral subjectivism, divine command theory, etc. and argue that act-utilitarianism does better than all the others in terms of our standards for evaluating moral theories (i.e., consistency, determinacy, intuitive appeal, internal support, etc.). A more sensible thesis would focus on defending act-utilitarianism against certain specific objections or would argue that act- utilitarianism is more plausible than, say, Kantianism with respect to the determinacy of its verdicts.
  • Death and suffering from a lack food, potable water, and basic healthcare is bad.
  • NOTE: This is trivial; no reasonable person would disagree.
  • I will discuss objections to moral relativism.
    NOTE: It’s not enough to say that you will discuss a certain issue; you must state your position on some issue.
  • I believe that the divine command theory is an implausible moral theory.
    NOTE: This statement merely reports what one believes; it doesn’t assert anything about the plausibility of the divine command theory. A thesis statement must make an assertion about the issue at hand, not about one’s beliefs concerning that issue.
  • I will argue that abortion is wrong.
    NOTE: This statement isn’t specific enough. Your thesis should explain why, on your view, abortion is wrong.
  • I will argue that donating our surplus income to hunger relief organizations would result in more deaths and more suffering.
  • NOTE: The issue of whether or not donating our surplus income to hunger relief organizations would result in more deaths and more suffering is an empirical issue, not a philosophical issue. You must address some philosophical issue. Thus a more interesting thesis would address the following issue: If donating our surplus income would alleviate significant suffering and save lives, would we then be morally obligated to do so.

Do have a thesis like this:

  • I will argue that even if the fetus is a person with a right to life, abortion is, nevertheless, morally permissible in the case of rape, for the fetus has no right to use the woman's body without, at least, her tacit consent, and this is clearly absent where the woman is pregnant as a result of being raped.
  • NOTE: The position you take doesn’t have to exhaust the topic. For instance, there’s nothing wrong with taking a stand on the morality of abortion in the case of rape while remaining neutral about other cases.
  • I will argue that Thomson's argument isn’t cogent. I will demonstrate that there are important differences between killing the violinist (in her Famous Violinist Example) and killing a fetus that has been conceived as a result of rape. These differences undermine her argument by analogy for the permissibility of abortion in the case of rape.
    NOTE: You don’t have to make any positive assertion. A thesis that asserts that some philosophical position is false or that some philosopher’s argument is unsound is an interesting and important thesis.
  • I will argue that Arthur's criticisms fail to undermine Singer's central thesis: that we are morally obligated to donate our surplus income to hunger-relief organizations. I will show that Singer can rebut Arthur’s objections by....
    NOTE: Even if you agree entirely with one of the philosophers that you’ve read, you can still have something original and important to say. For instance, you could show how that philosopher might rebut criticisms from another.
  • I will argue that Singer's thesis needs to be revised in light of Arthur's criticisms, but only slightly. I will propose the following revised version of Singer's thesis.... And I will argue that this revised version of Singer’s thesis avoids Arthur's objections. Lastly, I will defend this revised thesis against other potential objections. NOTE: If you can’t see anyway to defend a thesis in its current form, you might suggest how that thesis could be revised so as to avoid the objections leveled by another.
  • I will argue that many of the objections that have been leveled against act- utilitarianism can be met and that, on the whole, act-utilitarianism is a rather plausible theory. Nevertheless, I will admit that one serious objection remains, for which I can see no adequate response—namely, .... However, this does not mean that we should reject the theory, for, as I will show, non-utilitarian theories face the following more serious objection...
  • NOTE: Often times, you’ll find that all the alternative positions face some problem or another. In that case, you can still defend one position over its rivals by arguing that it faces fewer or less serious problems than the others do. Of course, you still need be upfront about the problems that your own favored position faces, and, in light of those potential problems, you may want to make your thesis somewhat tentative: “utilitarianism seems to be the most promising position” rather than “utilitarianism is correct."

0 thoughts on “Thesis Statement For Business Ethics

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *