First Crusade Research Paper

 

3

Trying to realize the background

for the crusades’ success, one can find no other

major reason then deep believe in God and the idea of Holy War, and in their inevitable ticket to Heaven in case joining the army. Of course, some argue that crusades were ignorant  peasants and angry for enrichment nobility, but we should not forget that very often in order to leave for the East a crusade was forced to sell all his possessions (which actually caused a widespread inflation

3

), as such kind of adventure was ruinously expensive, and only some of them did in fact got some gain. In order to support crusades the first income tax was introduced in Europe, and the church made a series of adjustments to the system of indulgences. Besides that, those leaving for the crusading were very well aware of the possible dangers they may meet on their way. On the one hand, those from the kn

ight’s class had the

taste of adventure and were largely searching for these threats in order to improve their status. Some even presume that it was better to send them fight on the East, than to experience continuous struggle in the West. But how can one explain the motive of a peasant leaving abandoned his goods and harvest, taking with him his wife and children and voluntary heading to the long unknown journey, expecting not to return? (Accordingly to some historians the casualty rate for the First Crusade was up to 75 per cent

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!). I can find now other reason then deep religious believes, willingness to please God, and confidence in automatic forgiveness of all their sins. This was one of the major reasons of the First

Crusade’

s success as it is well-known that the following periods of crusading were not anymore marked by such an enthusiasm. From the later period we remember such prominent

names as Richard I of England (the “

Lion heart

”), King Philip Augustus of France, Emperor

3

 Crawford, P. F. (2011). Four Myths about the Crusades.

 Intercollegiate Review

, 46(1), p.16

4

 Ibid, p.17

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Scene from the Legend of the True Cross

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